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This archived content is from Mary Wilkins’ sewing and quilting message board “Sew What’s New,” which was retired in August 2007. It is being provided by “Sew What’s Up,” which serves as the new home for many members of “Sew What’s New.”
From: melaniestenius
Date: 03-16-2007, 01:47 PM (1 of 30)
I have a pattern for a dress and I want to use a crinkle cotton fabric. The pattern calls for the facing to be interfaced- how do you put interfacing on a crinkle cotton? Or should I use bias tape instead of interfacing. If I use dias tape it would lower the neck line and I don't want to show alot of cleavage. The pattern in Butterick B4597. Help!
Melanie
User: melaniestenius
Member since: 03-15-2007
Total posts: 6
From: DorothyL
Date: 03-16-2007, 02:06 PM (2 of 30)
Use a non fusible interfacing.
Dorothy
User: DorothyL
Member since: 12-09-2002
Total posts: 3883
From: melaniestenius
Date: 03-16-2007, 03:28 PM (3 of 30)
I don't know why I didn't think of that. Probably because I am lazy:monkey:
Thanks Dorothy!
User: melaniestenius
Member since: 03-15-2007
Total posts: 6
From: DorothyL
Date: 03-16-2007, 04:55 PM (4 of 30)
That was an easy one.
Dorothy
User: DorothyL
Member since: 12-09-2002
Total posts: 3883
From: melaniestenius
Date: 03-16-2007, 06:11 PM (5 of 30)
Dorothy,
That question probably seemed funny to you. I am a new sewer and actually have never used sew-in interfacing. What seems strange to me is that my friend whom I sew with didn't have the answer and she has been sewing for over 40 years! Thank you so much again for your answer.
Melanie
User: melaniestenius
Member since: 03-15-2007
Total posts: 6
From: MotherInLaw
Date: 03-16-2007, 10:17 PM (6 of 30)
Melanie, I just ran into that same problem when I made the girls some little dresses made of searsucker. I had to interface them with non-fusible. The lady at the fabric store suggested it to me. I didn't even think of it when buying that fabric. But it's the most reasonable choice if you think about it.
I'm regressing back into my youth, I just have to figure out how I'm going to convience my body to come along with me.
User: MotherInLaw
Member since: 06-25-2005
Total posts: 1118
From: AndreaSews
Date: 03-16-2007, 11:05 PM (7 of 30)
You never know what you'll learn from people, of all levels of experience, really. I've made garments with both crinkle cotton (didn't call for interfacing) and with seersucker, and now that I'm reading this thread, I can see why a sew-in would have been a better interfacing for that seersucker than fusible. It just never occurred to me. I remember being disappointed when the fabric lost its dimension, but I never thought about what could be done about it. Thanks for asking the Q here.
Andrea
User: AndreaSews
Member since: 02-18-2005
Total posts: 1007
From: DorothyL
Date: 03-17-2007, 08:33 AM (8 of 30)
I didn't mean to sound flip. It was just sitting near the top of my brain because I just went through a minor interfacing crisis.
I'm making a jacket out of an acrylic poly blend. I bought woven rather than knit iron on interfacing but I was really concerned that the iron on would bubble as it often does on synthetics.
I was going to go ahead and try it but the darn thing was looking so good on the inside with Hong Kong seams and I didn't want to risk it. And I hate to use the non woven sew in stuff. I just don't like that non woven stuff whether it is sew in or iron on.
I ended up using some soft light weight twill scraps I had and it works well and looks great.
I remember years ago using scrap cottons rather than commercial interfacing and they always looked good and saved money.
Dorothy
User: DorothyL
Member since: 12-09-2002
Total posts: 3883
From: mcfay
Date: 03-17-2007, 07:59 PM (9 of 30)
Years ago when I would make dresses out of polyester/cotton blend, if the fabric was a solid color I would use the same fabric as the dress for interfacing. Mostly because I couldn't afford to buy the interfacing.
User: mcfay
Member since: 01-30-2007
Total posts: 16
From: MotherInLaw
Date: 03-18-2007, 12:43 AM (10 of 30)
I guess it like Ann the Gran told us at an embroidery conference. Who says you have to color a tree green, why not color it red if it works do it. Same goes for interfacings and anything else. You have to think out the box sometimes to get the desired finished product. :bg:
I'm regressing back into my youth, I just have to figure out how I'm going to convience my body to come along with me.
User: MotherInLaw
Member since: 06-25-2005
Total posts: 1118
From: Cathie.Tombs
Date: 05-13-2007, 06:29 PM (11 of 30)
Hi there. I know this was posted a little while ago, but it is very topical. I LOVE crinkle - because I hate to iron, and because it works for my hot flashes, because I love the texture, and feel against my skin. Crinkle comes in different weights, and different fabric contents. I got some very fine rayon striped crinkle at a charity fabric sale a few days ago, gossamer light. I think there are lots of good suggestions here re: interfacing crinkle. But, I really, really like to face it with bias, and turn the bias in. You can sew the bias at 1/4 inch seam, and so you could cut the neck/sleeves a little in from the 5/8 seam. I use commercial bias, ironing if needed to get the width I want, or make silk bias (out of old silk blouses from charity shops). I am working up to having the silk bias show, as piping, or a decorative bias. This is a lighter treatment than facings/interfacings. Hope this helps. Happy sewing. Happy Mothers' Day too!!!!!!!
User: Cathie.Tombs
Member since: 08-27-2006
Total posts: 44
From: MaryW
Date: 05-14-2007, 08:40 AM (12 of 30)
Amazing how the hot flashes can dictate everything isn't it. I also read on the weekend how cotton crinkle fabrics will bag out at the bum and knees. It does revert back after washing tho. Something to remember.

In More Fabric Savvy she says to pre-shrink the cotton crinkle. Press slightly to remove some of the pleating. Before you cut out facings, press that fabric as flat as possible and interface with fusible tricot.
MaryW
owner/editor of Sew Whats New
User: MaryW
Member since: 06-23-2005
Total posts: 2542
From: DorothyL
Date: 05-14-2007, 08:42 AM (13 of 30)
If you press crinkle before you cut out your pattern you will always have to press the finished garment for it to look good. I had a favorite dress...................
Dorothy
User: DorothyL
Member since: 12-09-2002
Total posts: 3883
From: MaryW
Date: 05-14-2007, 08:47 AM (14 of 30)
But if you pressed it flat, then fused interfacing would that not keep it flat? I must try it and see. I have some crinkle polyester, wonder if it would work that that? Hmm.
MaryW
owner/editor of Sew Whats New
User: MaryW
Member since: 06-23-2005
Total posts: 2542
From: AndreaSews
Date: 05-14-2007, 09:54 PM (15 of 30)
Yes, Mary, those pieces that were fused (waistbands, facings?) would stay flat if fused properly and if the fusible interfacing is of good enough quality to stand up to washings, etc. But the rest would be crinkled. This might not matter, depending on where it's used. But I agree with one of the above posters--This light fabric is meant for carefree pieces and a bias binding, either concealed or not, would be preferable. Not the kind sold in packs (Wrights trims) but bias of the same light gauze.
Andrea
User: AndreaSews
Member since: 02-18-2005
Total posts: 1007
From: MaryW
Date: 05-15-2007, 12:10 PM (16 of 30)
Andrea, I am working with a crinkle poly mix fabric. I had one heck of a time pressing the fabric flat but once I did and applied the interfacing it was fine. Just to make sure I put it thru a wash and rinse. It held just fine. However, I do agree, with this fabric bindings are preferable to facings anytime.
MaryW
owner/editor of Sew Whats New
User: MaryW
Member since: 06-23-2005
Total posts: 2542
From: DorothyL
Date: 05-15-2007, 01:25 PM (17 of 30)
I hope you pressed it flat and applied the interfacing before you cut the facing or it might not fit the garment which wasn't pressed flat.
Dorothy
User: DorothyL
Member since: 12-09-2002
Total posts: 3883
From: MaryW
Date: 05-15-2007, 02:00 PM (18 of 30)
This was just a test swatch. My top has no facings. :nah:
MaryW
owner/editor of Sew Whats New
User: MaryW
Member since: 06-23-2005
Total posts: 2542
From: DorothyL
Date: 05-15-2007, 04:18 PM (19 of 30)
Seems like the best solution.
Dorothy
User: DorothyL
Member since: 12-09-2002
Total posts: 3883
From: PaulineG
Date: 05-16-2007, 06:48 AM (20 of 30)
Just today I bought some gorgeous floral and striped crinkles (two different types but co-ordinated) with some vague idea of making something for my dd (too cute and too cheap to pass by). I've thought about making a bag from them (instead or as well - I'm not sure) and I would need to iron them and then apply the interfacing.

They are fairly lightweight. The weight may well be the deciding factor against using them. I've only used drill/canvas for bag making in the past.

Any comments or advice?
Pauline
User: PaulineG
Member since: 09-08-2006
Total posts: 901
From: IsabelleB
Date: 05-16-2007, 07:11 AM (21 of 30)
Adding my humble two cents about crinkle fabric... I made a blouse in a crinkle fabric last Autumn. It was a rather elaborate blouse (New Look 6513 (http://simplicity.com/dv1_v4.cfm?design=6513)), and it needed some stiffness in the collar and cuffs. I decided to press only those parts so I could use some fusible interfacing. It worked really well.
It is a bit challenging to sew those crinkle fabrics, but a little more concentration does the trick - and it is so worth it.
Here's the blouse:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v237/e-zabelle/pix%20for%20boards/06-10-07blouse-trois-quarthalf.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v237/e-zabelle/pix%20for%20boards/06-10-07blouse-trois-quarthalf-1.jpg)
(ETA: clicking on the picture should lead you to a larger one :bluesmile )
Isabelle
Sewing blog: Kitty Couture
User: IsabelleB
Member since: 10-25-2006
Total posts: 265
From: temom
Date: 05-16-2007, 08:59 AM (22 of 30)
The butterfly skort and top that I just made for my daugter was made of crinkle cotton/poly, and I used the sew in interfacing. It was actually easier and quicker than the fusable. At first I wondered what seam allowance to use, then I decided to just use 5/8 inch, and sure enough, it worked out wonderfully. I thought I would ruin the look of the crinkle if I flattened it and adhered a fusible, so it would remain flat. I've had a non-crinkle garment ruined from the fusable interfacing, and really didn't want to repeat that!
Theresa
User: temom
Member since: 01-19-2007
Total posts: 410
From: MaryW
Date: 05-16-2007, 10:05 AM (23 of 30)
Lovely blouse Isabelle. Miles of ruffle to stitch.
MaryW
owner/editor of Sew Whats New
User: MaryW
Member since: 06-23-2005
Total posts: 2542
From: IsabelleB
Date: 05-17-2007, 12:20 PM (24 of 30)
Thank you, Mary! :bluesmile I had such a blast making that blouse.
Isabelle
Sewing blog: Kitty Couture
User: IsabelleB
Member since: 10-25-2006
Total posts: 265
From: MissTaraTara
Date: 05-17-2007, 03:13 PM (25 of 30)
What a beautiful blouse!! It looks like it was extremely difficult and took weeks to complete. It squashes that photo on the pattern cover flat!
User: MissTaraTara
Member since: 01-24-2006
Total posts: 227
From: Marilyn in MD
Date: 05-17-2007, 06:17 PM (26 of 30)
What a georgeous blouse! I love how the crinkle fabric made the ruffles look more luxurious. :up:
User: Marilyn in MD
Member since: 03-13-2006
Total posts: 14
From: Kaitlinnegan
Date: 05-18-2007, 10:10 AM (27 of 30)
Isabelle, that is lovely! I agree, much better than the pattern picture. I admit that I probably wouldn't have been brave enough to try that pattern in a crinkle fabric. Good for you! :up:

For those of you that have experience working with crinkle fabric -- how do you wash it so it doesn't lose the crinkle? Is it dry clean only generally, or hand wash/dry flat, or can you throw it in the washer and dryer?
http://www.sew-whats-up.com - the new home for Sew What's New
User: Kaitlinnegan
Member since: 03-20-2006
Total posts: 222
From: IsabelleB
Date: 05-18-2007, 02:07 PM (28 of 30)
Thanks everyone! It wasn't that difficult, just required a bit more concentration, that's all. :bluesmile
The trouble is when I wear it to class, the female students seem more interested in the blouse than the class! :re: (they don't know I sew - that's my secret garden).

Kaitlin, I washed my fabric normally (30 Celsius) and let it dry flat. I was afraid the crinkles might be lost a little if I had hung it to dry (don't have a dryer :bluewink:).
This particular fabric was poly-cotton.
Isabelle
Sewing blog: Kitty Couture
User: IsabelleB
Member since: 10-25-2006
Total posts: 265
From: MartySews2
Date: 05-18-2007, 05:58 PM (29 of 30)
Beautiful blouse, Isabella. You did such a nice job on it.
Marty:bolt:
User: MartySews2
Member since: 05-03-2007
Total posts: 293
From: DorothyL
Date: 05-18-2007, 06:32 PM (30 of 30)
It is beautiful.
Great job.
Dorothy
User: DorothyL
Member since: 12-09-2002
Total posts: 3883
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